Medical Procedures all Round by Daquiri (Lowtown to Sallins via Naas)

We bade farewell to Lowtown & cruised all of ten minutes to our favourite little Robertstown jetty where we even got a bit of sunshine.

We spent a few days here while mum was working & she also cycled to Newbridge for shopping & to check out the Whitewater shopping centre which could be a potential calendar club option if it happens here this year. Mum came back ecstatic as she found an M&S with a food section. I think this has been her highlight of 2021!!!

Mum also finally finished her next virtual cycling challenge so she has now virtually cycled the Grand Canyon. She embarked straightaway on the next one which is Lands End to John O Groats back in the Uk. Although sadly this has had to be put on hold for reasons we explain lower down.

Robertstown is nice for us as we get off lead walkies up the towpath. Here’s Cosmo in action & me… well um… not in action…. yawning!!

After a few days mum moved round to the harbour wall to fill up with water & most importantly she stocked up on dog food from the local shop & the nice man even wheeled it across for mum on a trolley. We like him!

I think mum must have come over ill as she decided to wash the boat too & that doesn’t happen often! But it turned out a fortuitous move as a lovely couple were walking past & got chatting to mum. Anyway they very kindly offered to help mum with the next locks so arrangements were made & the next day we set off to meet Sarah & Declan at the first lock. Now we nearly didn’t make it as Golden Boyz unusually was misbehaving & kept losing propulsion. We’re desperate to get the boat serviced but engineers are only covering emergency work during lockdown & mum suspects it needs a fuel filter change. Anyway we made it. We had a fabulous day as at the first lock we also met Michael the grandson of one of the old lock keepers who also helped us. It was a lovely sunny day & we had quite an audience at most of the locks. We were soon tied up at Digby Bridge & Sarah & Declan even kindly took our diesel cans to fill up.

It was a nice spot there & mum deemed it a perfect boat painting spot so she finally finished the side that she’d started way back in Oct in Ferbane so we are no longer spotty & looking smart (well on one side only). We stayed at Digby a few days & had nice walkies in both directions. Look at us being brave crossing the lock gates.

Heading in the Sallins Direction we crossed Leinster Aqueduct. It looks a long way down!

A few days later we tootled to Sallins for water & pumpout & then onwards to the next lock at McCreaveys where a few of our boater pals were moored. It was a great spot for us next to a stunning golf course & no nearby roads so lots of offlead time for us.

It was nice for mum to catch up with friends too & one day they set up an amazing Art session for the big & little kids using clingfilm between the trees & spray paint.

Mum cycled to nearby Straffan & then back via Sallins on St Paddys day which was sadly for the 2nd year running cancelled but she got a few photos of a few decorations. She also stopped at a little cafe & had Irish stew for lunch in celebration even though she did have to sit on a bench outside to eat it. Next year surely it has got to happen!!!

Then after a few days at McCreaveys our original mission sadly beckoned which was to get us to the vets for our booster jabs so we headed back to Sallins & then turned onto the Naas Branch at Soldiers Island. Soldier’s Island is a small island at the conjunction of main line of Grand Canal and the Naas branch. The triangular island at the junction is known locally as Soldier’s Island. Some say the name comes from the ghost of a soldier who hung himself there; more likely it refers to the location of a guard post during the 1798 disturbances when the canal barges were often raided by rebels.

We were then on the Naas branch & new waters for us.

The Naas Branch was constructed by an independent company in 1786, with pick and shovel. The purpose was to carry trade from Kilcullen along the Herbertstown/Corbally Branch and onwards to the main line of the Grand Canal through Sallins and onto Dublin. In the end, the canal was only built as far Corbally Harbour, a further 8km from Naas Harbour, where the water source is located. Trading ceased altogether on the Grand Canal in 1959 and the canal gradually became derelict.

In 1977, Dublin IWAI began work to restore the Naas Branch of the canal. Regular campaigning at Boat Rallies over the following years pushed for restoration of the Naas Branch. Much of this restoration work took place during the tenure of the OPW. In 1984, Kildare IWAI was formed and in 1987, the Naas Branch of the Grand Canal was officially reopened. Leinster Leader  It was 2002 when Naas Harbour was finally reopened. However, the Herbertstown/Corbally Branch has remained closed to navigation because of the obstruction and culvert under the Limerick Road.

The above exert & further info on the Naas Branch can be found here on the IWAI Kildare Page : Naas Branch

It is not used much so we were keen to travel it on the basis of use it or lose it. We were pleasantly surprised with our journey.

We spent our first night moored by the first lock N1 & wandered backwards to look at the remains of Sallins Dry Dock for which further info can be found here: Sallins Dry Dock

The next morning our hero Ais arrived to do the locks for us. They were easier than we expected since they’re barely used. There’s five in total with the second one N2 passing by Leinster Mill.

We’d fallen lucky as it was a sunny day & 2.5hours later & after passing the Naas goats we arrived in Naas harbour.

We moored up in a great spot by the Youth Centre & popped out for coffee & cake. It was great to be in a town with supermarkets & takeaways galore. Ais performed surgery on Falcon who had succumbed to a puncture from a thorn. Luckily there was a bike shop right near the canal so a puncture kit was purchased.

Naas Harbour is as far as is navigable by narrowboat. Naas Harbour is a real gem of Kildare’s county town. It boasts safe mooring in the shadow of the restored Canal Stores and is located only a short distance from all that Naas has to offer. The canal harbour at Naas is of considerable social and historical importance, having been built in the early eighteenth century, promoting the commercialisation and industrialisation of the locality. The construction of the harbour and canal section is a feat of technical engineering merit, while the cut-granite retaining walls attest to the high quality of stone masonry practised in the locality. Closed to commercial traffic in the 1961, the canal harbour has nevertheless been well maintained ever since and is an attractive and picturesque feature in the centre of the town

The harbour was even illuminated at night looking very pretty.

Interestingly opposite us a swan had made her nest on some flowerbeds right by a busy path so the council arrived & put barricades up to protect them.

Whilst we were moored at Naas Harbour we fleetingly appeared in a local comedians video. We’re at about 3mins 40secs blink & you’ll miss us!

Black Paddy in Naas

From Naas Harbour you can walk or canoe along the Corbally Branch. We walked! The recent history of Corbally goes back to 1811, when the canal was first built as a transport hub for Tuthill & Reeves, the Mill located 2 miles away in Athgarvan near Newbridge.  Its industrial history revolved around the shipping of goods to Newbridge, Kilcullen and Athgarvan and the transport of malt along the Harbour Road to Corbally, where it was loaded onto barges in the Harbour, and then carried along the Grand Canal to the Arthur Guinness Brewery in Dublin. Today unfortunately, the culvert at the R445 makes it impassable to walkers, cyclists and boaters. It still acts as a feeder for the Naas branch.

We walked as far as Jigginstown Castle which was buried under scaffolding for refurbishment.

Each year there is a big Naas Rally in October & we’ve got our fingers crossed that maybe just maybe that one will happen this year. Here’s the programme from the last rally Naas Rally

Anyway sadly our reason for being at Naas loomed large & we were frogmarched off to a vets within walking distance. I went in first as mum rudely said I was the worst behaved!! The vet said I was very good or something along the lines of I’ll do anything for a treat!! Anyway there’s fabulous news as I’m no longer fat!! Apparently I’m only 0.7kg heavier than Cosmo now so yay I can have bigger dinners & more treats I reckon!!

Sadly our visit to Naas was cut short as the day we arrived mum got a surprise phonecall from Tullamore Hospital to say that she could come in for her gall bladder operation the next week. We expected there to be a massive backlog & to be honest expected to wait until 2022 for the op. Now although this cut our visit short the timing is so much better than getting the call just as we come out of lockdown so mum grabbed the opportunity. She thought as there was noone else moored at Naas it was better to return to Sallins to be by other boats as she will have no heavy lifting for 4-6 weeks which we presume includes a 16 tonne boat! So a rallying cry for help was sent our & Damien from Sallins kindly came down with his 2 boys & whizzed us back up the locks. So Naas has gone on our list to go back to when we can so we can explore properly.

So it was operation operation if you get my drift! Two lovely boater friends Erin & Dave who have recently had a baby have hired a cottage for a few weeks & so kindly offered for mum to stay with them as she’s supposed to have someone with her the night of the op & Dave ferried mum to & from the hospital. We were booked into kennels as apparently we pull – us as if!!!

So Monday mum was off to the hospital for her pre op of an ECG, covid swab & blood tests. It was hilarious she came back having had something stuck up her nose – we have no sympathy as she knows how we feel having the kennel cough squirty thing up our noses every year. Tuesday we were shipped off to Wuffys & Snuggles & boy oh boy it was fantastic. We have a huge paddock to run around & other doggies come & visit on daycare. We might stay here & not go back to the boat!

So while we were here mum was shipped off to Tullamore Hospital. She hadn’t realised that keyhole surgery meant you got a general anaesthetic & put on a ventilator so it was a bit bigger procedure than she’d realised.

She has 4 little insertions in her tummy & her gall bladder has now been removed. Apparently we don’t need it anyway bit like our appendix. She’s very fragile & was woozy for a day or two but is recovering while we’re partying at Wuffys.

Once we’re back we’ll have to stay put for a few weeks as mum can’t manage pulling the boat in to moor up but as the lockdown in Ireland is never ending we’re not missing much. Mum is hoping to get the boat serviced before we move & then we’ll be off adventuring again.

The big news is some friends of ours from the UK have just arrived with their boat & they have a fab doggie called Philpot so here he is making his debut in the Golden Boyz blog. Oh & his mum & dad Steve & Rosie!!

So although yet again its been a period of minimal cruising we’ve still had some adventures. Now for a change we haven’t got our usual sunset photos but mum did get some fantastic shots of a swan in flight at McCreaveys so we’ll finish with those this time and with an Irish Toast that we think you’ll like.

2 thoughts on “Medical Procedures all Round by Daquiri (Lowtown to Sallins via Naas)

  1. Goodness, so many adventures despite the restrictions. So glad the operation was a success. Hope you’re starting to feel better and brighter. Fingers crossed for St Patrick’s Day 2022!

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